James Jeffords on Abortion

Last Updated : Apr 28, 2010

Voting Record

Child Interstate Abortion Notification Act

The second vote on the legislation came as the bill returned from the US House. In roll call 263, supporters of the bill failed to get the 60 votes required for cloture. The bill did not proceed further as most Republicans supported the legislation and most Democrats oppossed it. James Jeffords oppossed the Notification Act by voting against cloture.

James Jeffords oppossed the Notification Act by voting against cloture.

Child Interstate Abortion Notification Act

There have been 2 votes in the Senate concerning the Child Interstate Abortion Notification Act S 403. The Act prohibited transporting a minor child across a state line to obtain an abortion. There was an exception in the bill if the life of the mother was at risk, and those transporting the minor could not be prosecuted if there was reason to believe that the transporters were under the impression that permission had been given from the minor\'s parents. The first vote on this bill came as the bill passed through the Senate. The bill passed the senate in a 54-34 vote with most Republicans supporting it, and about 1/3 of Democrats supporting it. James Jeffords voted against the Notification Act.

James Jeffords voted against the Notification Act.

Unborn Victims of Violence Act

The Unborn Victim\'s of Violence Act of 2004 (also known as Laci and Connor\'s Law) provides that persons who commit certain Federal violent crimes and thereby cause the death of, or bodily injury to, a child who is in utero shall be guilty of a separate offense. The bill came up vote a vote in March of 2004, and passed with the support of a vast majority of Republicans and about 1/3 of the Democrats. James Jeffords voted against the Unborn Victims of Violence Act.

James Jeffords voted against the Unborn Victims of Violence Act.

Partial Birth Abortion

In 1999 the US Senate voted to ban Partial Birth Abortions. The bill defined the term "partial birth abortion" and then made it a crime for a physician to commit such an act. The act defined partial birth abortion as an abortion in which the person performing the abortion deliberately and intentionally: vaginally delivers some portion of an intact living fetus until the fetus is partially outside the body of the mother, for the purpose of performing an overt act that the person knows will kill the fetus while the fetus is partially outside the mother's body; performs the overt act that kills the fetus while the intact living fetus is partially outside the mother's body. The bill initially passed the Senate in Roll Call 51 in 2003. James Jeffords voted against the 2003 ban when it initially came up in the Senate.

James Jeffords voted against the 2003 ban when it initially came up in the Senate.

Expressing the Sense of the Senate in Roe vs Wade

In March of 2003, the Senate voted on a sense of the Senate resolution affirming their support for the Supreme court's decision in Roe vs Wade. The measure passed the Senate 52-46. James Jeffords voted in favor of the measure and supported Roe vs Wade.

James Jeffords voted in favor of the measure and supported Roe vs Wade.

Partial Birth Abortion

The 2003 Partial Birth Abortion Ban defined the term as an abortion in which the person performing the abortion: deliberately and intentionally vaginally delivers a living fetus until, in the case of a head-first presentation, the entire fetal head is outside the mother's body, or, in the case of a breech presentation, any part of the fetal trunk past the navel is outside the mother's body; performs the overt act, other than completion of delivery, that kills the partially delivered living fetus. The bill was voted on separately and in a conference report. James Jeffords voted against the 2003 ban when it came up in the conference report.

James Jeffords voted against the 2003 ban when it came up in the conference report.

Partial Birth Abortion

After the 2000 Partial Birth Abortion Bill passed the Senate, it went over to the House and was voted on again in roll call 402 to pass the conference report which was the compilation of the bills in the House and Senate. James Jeffords voted against the 2000 ban.

James Jeffords voted against the 2000 ban.

Roe vs Wade

As part of the 1999 partial birth abortion ban, an amendment was introduced to express the sense of the senate in expressing support for Roe vs Wade. The amendment was supported by a majority of Democrats and a few Republicans The amendment passed in a 51-47 vote. James Jeffords voted in favor of the amendment and thus supported Roe vs Wade.

James Jeffords voted in favor of the amendment and thus supported Roe vs Wade.

Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 1997

In May of 1997, the Senate passed the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 1997 in a 64-36 vote. The Senate did not have the numbers to overturn a Presidential veto. James Jeffords voted against the ban.

James Jeffords voted against the ban.

Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 1995

In December of 1995, the Senate passed the partial-birth abortion ban act 54-44. The legislation was vetoed by President Clinton. James Jeffords voted against the ban.

James Jeffords voted against the ban.

 

Sponsored and Cosponsored Legislation

Session-109; Bill Number-S 2593; Freedom of Choice Act - Cosponsor

A bill to protect, consistent with Roe v. Wade, a woman's freedom to choose to bear a child or terminate a pregnancy, and for other purposes.

Session-106; Bill Number-S 1200; Equity in Prescription Insurance and Contraceptive Coverage Act of 1999 - Cosponsor

A bill to require equitable coverage of prescription contraceptive drugs and devices, and contraceptive services under health plans.

Session-103; Bill Number-S 25; Freedom of Choice Act of 1993 - Cosponsor

Provides that a State may not restrict the right of a woman to choose to terminate a pregnancy before fetal viability. Allows a State to: (1) restrict the freedom of a woman to chose to terminate a pregnancy after viability unless the termination is necessary to protect the life or health of the woman; and (2) impose requirements on abortions if the requirements are necessary to protect the life or health of the woman. Declares that nothing in this Act shall be construed to prevent a State from: (1) protecting individuals or private health care institutions from having to participate in abortions to which they are conscientiously opposed; (2) declining to pay for abortions; or (3) requiring minors to involve responsible adults before terminating a pregnancy.

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