Hillary Clinton on Immigration

Last Updated : Jan 21, 2011

Summary

HIllary Clinton supports amnesty for illegal immigrants. She has continually spoken out against the enforcement of US laws and in favor of laws that grant amnesty.

In 2006, Senator Clinton stated that those who were seeking to enforce US immigration laws were not in keeping with her understanding of the scripture. She stated that legislation being introduced by Republicans would probably criminalize Jesus himself.

As a Senator and candidate for President, Hillary Clinton supported amnesty through a comprehensive immigration reform plan. She noted during the Presidential debates that US immigration laws did not need to be followed, but that those who broke other laws would not receive amnesty. She voted in favor of the 2006 Comprehensive Reform Package, and in favor of the Dream Act.

When asked about whether or not she would support driver's licenses for illegal immigrants, Senator Clinton did not answer the question directly but stated that granting amnesty would negate the question. Senator Clinton also stated in an interview that she would not oppose sanctuary city policies.

During the debate over the Arizona immigration law, Secretary of State Clinton stated that the law would lead to profiling.

 

Immigration and the Bible

In 2006, Republicans were attempting to make it illegal to aid people in violating federal immigration laws. Senator Clinton responded to these actions by stating that they were contrary to her views on Christianity.

 

The Drexel Debate

During the Drexel debate in October of 2007, Senator Clinton had the discussion below with Senator Dodd and the moderator when asked about illegal immigrants and drivers licenses. Senator Clinton stated that she recognized why someone would do it. She called for amnesty through a "comprehensive reform plan." She noted that granting driver's licenses to illegals would not be necessary if we simply passed immigration reform and made everyone legal, and then given them licenses.

 

The DREAM Act

In January of 2008, Senator Clinton responded to questions about the DREAM act by providing the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) with a statement voicing her support:

 

The Texas Debate

During the Texas Presidential Debate in February of 2008, Senator Clinton noted her support for amnesty through a comprehensive immigration reform plan. She also notes that violation of federal immigration laws is not to be considered a crime. She noted that when amnesty would be granted, a check would be made for those who broke real laws, and anyone who broke a law not relating to immigration would not be granted amnesty.

 

The Arizona Immigration Law

In May of 2010, Secretary of State Clinton appeared on "This Week" and spoke about the Arizona immigration law. She noted her opposition to the law, stated that it would cause racial profiling, and then noted that the law was born of frustration because the federal government had not granted amnesty.

 

Sanctuary Cities

In May of 2008, Senator Clinton was interviewed by Bill O'Reilly and stated that she would not oppose the practices of sanctuary cities.

Voting Record

Funding for Sanctuary Cities

Sactuary cities are those that allow illegal immigrants to reside within their borders with the understanding that the local government with not seek to determine immigration status or enforce the federal mandates concerning immigration. Senator Vitter put forth an amendment to create a reserve fund to hold money that would normally go to these sanctuary cities. On March 13, 2008, a motion was put forth to "table" or remove the amendment from consideration. Virtually all Democrats, and about 1/4 of the Republicans in office agreed to remove the amendment from consideration in a 58-40 vote. Hillary Clinton voted to table the amendment, and therefore supported the sanctuary city policy.

Hillary Clinton voted to table the amendment, and therefore supported the sanctuary city policy.

The DREAM Act

When the Comprehensive Immigration Reform Bill failed to pass, several members of congress attempted to achieve the same goal by passing the individual pieces of legislation that comprised the Reform Package. The DREAM Act was one such piece of legislation that grants citizenship to those that came to this country prior to the age of 16. Although the Bill got some support from both Democrats and Republicans, it too failed to pass the Senate in a 52-44 vote. Hillary Clinton voted in favor of the DREAM Act.

Hillary Clinton voted in favor of the DREAM Act.

Comprehensive Immigration Reform

In June of 2007, Congress attempted to pass the Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2007. The bill iteself was a series of smaller pieces of legislation which established the requisites for people living in the US illegally to obtain amnesty. The bill also sought to grant other rights to illegal immigrants prior to and after they become citizens. Despite a massive Public Relations campaign to promote the legislation, the bill got no Republican support and roughly 2/3 of the support of the Democrats. The bill was rejected in the Senate in a 61-34 vote. Hillary Clinton voted in favor of the Comprehensive Immigration Reform Bill.

Hillary Clinton voted in favor of the Comprehensive Immigration Reform Bill.

The Secure Fence Act

The Secure Fence Act passed the Senate in 2006, and required the director of homeland security to take operational control over certain areas along the border in an effort to cut down on both violence and illegal immigration. The enjoyed broad support and passed the Senate in an 80-19 vote. Hillary Clinton voted in favor of the Secure Fence Act.

Hillary Clinton voted in favor of the Secure Fence Act.

Immigration Reform Act of 2006

In 2006, the Senate attempted to pass an immigration reform bill. S 2611 passed the Senate in a 62-36 vote with the support of about 40% of the Republicans and all but 4 Democrats. Hillary Clinton voted in favor of the Immigration Reform Act of 2006.

Hillary Clinton voted in favor of the Immigration Reform Act of 2006.

 

Sponsored and Cosponsored Legislation

Session-110; Bill Number-S 774; DREAM Act of 2007 - Cosponsor

Amends the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 to repeal the denial of an unlawful alien's eligibility for higher education benefits based on state residence unless a U.S. national is similarly eligible without regard to such state residence. Authorizes the Secretary of Homeland Security to cancel the removal of, and adjust to conditional permanent resident status, an alien who: (1) entered the United States before his or her sixteenth birthday, and has been present in the United States for at least five years immediately preceding enactment of this Act; (2) is a person of good moral character; (3) is not inadmissible or deportable under specified grounds of the Immigration and Nationality Act; (4) at the time of application, has been admitted to an institution of higher education, or has earned a high school or equivalent diploma; and (5) from the age of 16 and older, has never been under a final order of exclusion, deportation, or removal.

Session-109; Bill Number-S 2075; DREAM Act of 2005 - Cosponsor

A bill to amend the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 to permit States to determine State residency for higher education purposes and to authorize the cancellation of removal and adjustment of status of certain alien students who are long-term United States residents and who entered the United States as children, and for other purposes.

Session-109; Bill Number-S Res 551; Social Security and Illegal Immigrants - Cosponsor

Expresses the sense of the Senate that illegal immigrants should not receive Social Security benefits and that this prohibition should be strictly enforced.

Session-108; Bill Number-S 1545; Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act of 2003 - Cosponsor

Authorizes the Secretary of Homeland Security to cancel the removal of, and adjust to conditional permanent resident status, an alien who: (1) entered the United States prior to his or her sixteenth birthday, and has been present in the United States for at least five years immediately preceding enactment of this Act; (2) is a person of good moral character; (3) is not inadmissible or deportable under specified criminal, security, smuggling, or illegal entrant or immigration violator grounds, with certain age-related exceptions; (4) at the time of application, has been admitted to an institution of higher education, or has earned a U.S. high school or equivalent diploma; and (5) from the age of 16 and older, has never been under a final order of exclusion, deportation, or removal. Authorizes waiver of certain grounds of deportability or ineligibility for humanitarian, family or public interest reasons. Prohibits removal of an alien whose conditional status application is pending. Sets forth continuous presence provisions.

References

[1] Website: The New York Times Article: Mrs. Clinton Says G.O.P.'s Immigration Plan Is at Odds With the Bible Author: NINA BERNSTEIN Accessed on: 01/20/2011

[2] Website: DiverseEducation.com Article: Where Do Presidential Candidates Stand on The DREAM Act? Author: Dina Horwedel Accessed on: 01/20/2011

[3] Website: Real Clear Politics Article: Clinton: Arizona Immigration Law Invites Racial Profiling, Questions Legality Author: RCP Staff Accessed on: 01/20/2011

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