Ruben Hinojosa on Education

Last Updated : Aug 11, 2010

Summary

Congressman Hinojosa supports increased funding and accommodations for students who don't speak english. He supports government funding for pre-school. He has voted in favor of No Child Left Behind, against the DC voucher program, and against allowing people to pay for school with IRA type accounts.

 

Support for English Language Learners

Congressman Hinojosa spoke in November of 2009 about students in America who do not speak english and he states that it is a civil right for those who do not speak english, to be provided with additional equipment and funding to learn the material without learning english.

 

Support for Head Start

In 2007, Congressman Hinojosa spoke about his support for the Head Start Program and it's increased benefits for hispanic people.

 

Official Website Statements

 

Voting Record

America COMPETES Reauthorization Act

In May of 2010 the House voted on reauthorizing the America COMPETES Act. The act passed the House 262-150. Ruben Hinojosa voted in favor of reauthorizing the America COMPETES Act.

Ruben Hinojosa voted in favor of reauthorizing the America COMPETES Act.

College Cost Reduction and Access Act

The College Cost Reduction and Access Act is a significant education bill dealing largely with funding for higher education. The bill removes tuition sensitivity for Pell Grants, increases the amount available for Pell grants, Funds the Upward Bound program, establishes the TEACH Grants, reduces student loan repayment rates, sets deferments based on need and establishes some partner based grants. The bill got the full support of the Democrats, but passed with the support of only about 1/4 of the Republicans. Ruben Hinojosa cast a "No Vote"

No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

No Child Left Behind was the primary focus of the Bush administration prior to 9/11. The bill requires states to develop assessments in basic skills to be given to all students in certain grades, if those states are to receive federal funding for schools. The Act does not assert a national achievement standard; standards are set by each individual state. The bill got the support of most Democrats and Republicans and passed the House in a 384-45 vote. Ruben Hinojosa voted in favor of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.

Ruben Hinojosa voted in favor of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.

DC Scholarship Program

In 1998, the House voted on an amendment to the yearly appropriations bill to Washington D.C.. The amendment allocated $7 Million dollars to a program for scholarships to low-income children. The amendment was ' agreed to with the support of most Republicans and most Democrats. Ruben Hinojosa voted against the DC Scholarship Program.

Ruben Hinojosa voted against the DC Scholarship Program.

Education Savings and School Excellence Act of 1998

This 1998 legislation would have allowed people to take money from their IRAs to pay for qualified elementary and secondary education expenses, including home schooling expenses. It increased the annual contribution limit from $500 to $2,000. It permits corporations to contribute to education IRAs. Although the bill passed both the house and the Senate, it was vetoed by the President. Ruben Hinojosa voted against the Education Savings and School Excellence Act of 1998.

Ruben Hinojosa voted against the Education Savings and School Excellence Act of 1998.

 

Sponsored and Cosponsored Legislation

Session-111; Bill Number-H R 5116; America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 - Cosponsor

America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 or America Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science Reauthorization Act of 2010

Session-110; Bill Number-H R 1971; Teach for America Act - Cosponsor

To provide for recruiting, selecting, training, and supporting a national teacher corps in underserved communities.

Session-110; Bill Number-H R 2928; Graduation Promise Act of 2007 - Prime Sponsor

To provide grants to States to improve high schools and raise graduation rates while ensuring rigorous standards, to develop and implement effective school models for struggling students and dropouts, and to improve State policies to raise graduation rates, and for other purposes.

User Comments