Ron Paul on Immigration

Last Updated : Dec 12, 2011

Summary

Congressman Paul believes US immigration law is valid and should be enforced. He opposes amnesty. He believes that the welfare state acts as an incentive to illegal immigrants to come to the country and that the subsidizing of illegal immigration encourages more of it. He has sought to clarify the meaning of the 14th amendment to verify that it does not grant citizenship to children of illegal aliens. In opposing amnesty, Congressman Paul has noted that we have granted blanket amnesty in the past and it only encouraged further illegal immigration. He notes that if we do it again, we will find ourselves in the same situation 10 years from now.

In December of 2005, Congressman Paul proposed a three part plan to address immigration. This plan first consisted of better enforcement of the laws we’ve got-- which plainly call for illegal immigrants to be arrested and deported and for our borders to be secured. Second, he proposed eliminating the two main magnets attracting illegal immigrants to illegally enter the country, the welfare magnet and the citizenship magnet. Finally, Congressman Paul proposes ending birth-right citizenship.

In April of 2006, Congressman Paul used his weekly address to call for an end to birthright citizenship and a return to enforcing US immigration laws. He stated that although it is often said that immigrants do the jobs Americans won’t do, in many instances illegal immigrants simply increase the supply of labor in a community, which lowers wages. He also states that while the labor seems cheap, it is much more expensive after the inclusion of the cost of social services and medical care.

Congressman Paul has also stated that illegal immigration has lead to a balkanization of the US, where the people within the country are subdivided by language and culture. In May of 2007, Congressman Paul opposed the immigration compromise proposed and stated that the agreement surrendered US sovereignty and was nothing more than amnesty in another name.

The subject of a national ID card has been approached numerous times since 9/11. Congressman Paul has repeatedly stated that subjecting American citizens to further scrutiny and identification will do nothing to deter or detract from the actions of those already in violation of the law.

In the Iowa debate, Congressman Paul stated that he did not support employer verification because he did not believe that businesses should be acting as a policing entity. In the Reagan debate, Congressman Paul stated that the citizenship and welfare magnets needed to be turned off.

In 2011, Congressman Paul proposed an immigration plan as part of his 2012 Presidential campaign. This plan included opposing REAl ID, enforcing border security, opposing amnesty, abolishing the welfare state, ending birthright citizenship, and protecting lawful immigrants.

 

National ID Cards

In May of 2005, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" edition to address the national ID card. He stated that the cards would not stop illegal immigration and would not stop terrorism.

 

Illegal Immigrants and Welfare

In August of 2005, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" to address the subject of illegal immigration and the welfare state in America.

 

Plan for Immigration

In December of 2005, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" to address immigration reform and enforcement. Congressman Paul also outlines steps that should be taken to fully address immigration.

 

The Immigration Question

In April of 2006, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" to discuss the question of immigration into the US.

 

Secure Fence Act of 2006

In September of 2006, Congressman Paul released a press statement noting his support for the Secure Fence Act of 2006. He also notes that the issue of birthright citizenship needs to be addressed.

 

Amnesty and the Welfare State

In September of 2006, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" to discuss the relationship with amnesty and welfare.

 

Rethinking Birthright Citizenship

In October of 2006, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" address to discuss the need to rethink birthright citizenship.

 

Immigration Compromise Sells Out Sovereignty

In May of 2007, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" to address the compromise in Congress concerning immigration reform to achieve amnesty for illegal aliens.

 

Amnesty Opponents are Not Un-American

In June of 2007, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" address to discuss accusations that those who support US immigration laws.

 

Illegal Immigration and Border Security

In December of 2007, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" to discuss illegal immigration and border security.

 

Subsidizing Illegal Immigration

In February of 2008, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" address to discuss the fact that if we subsidize illegal immigration then we will get more of it.

 

Securing Our Borders and Data Act

In August of 2008, Congressman Paul released a press statement noting his cosponsorship of the Securing Our Borders and Our Data Act.

In August of 2008, Congressman Paul released another statement noting the need for the Act

 

Immigration 101 Video

In an independently compiled video, a series of official Ron Paul commercials, debate questions, and interviews is compiled together to show Ron Paul's views on immigration. 

 

2008 Campaign Speech

In a 2008 campaign speech, Congressman Paul spoke about his views on immigration.

 

Des Moines Register Interview

During the 2008 Presidential campaign, Congressman Paul was interviewed by the Des Moines Register about his views concerning immigration.

 

2008 Interview

 

Return to National ID Cards

In March of 2010, Congressman Paul appeared on Fox News and discussed the recently proposed national ID cards. He discusses the failure to enforce immigration laws.

 

Iowa Debate

In August of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the Republican debate in Ames, Iowa. He was asked about his opposition to the e-verify mandate and stated that he had a strong position on immigration, but that he felt the rule made businesss owners perform policing activites.

 

Reagan Debate

In September of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the Reagan debate for the Republican primary. He was asked about immigration and spoke about fences and immigration.

 

Fox News / Google Debate

On September of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the Fox News / Google debate. He is asked about immigration and discusses the need to remove incentives and birthright citizenship.

 

The Western Debate

In October of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the Western Debate in Las Vegas. He was asked about a border fence and Latino voters. He states that he would not support a border fence, and that he opposed putting people into groups. He also stated that that rights don't come in bunches to groups and races.

 

Campaign Website Statements

 

 

2012 Presidential Campaign Website Statements

 

Voting Record

Removing Funds for Lawsuits

In May of 2012, the House voted on an amendment put forth by Congresswoman Black of Tennessee. The Amendment was to prohibit the use of funds to be used by the Attorney General to originate or join in any lawsuit that sought to overturn, enjoin, or invalidate Immigration Enforcement Laws in Oklahoma, Missouri, Arizona, Utah, Indiana, Alabama, South Carolina, and Georgia. The amendment passed 238-173 with most Republicans supporting it and most Democrats opposing it. Ron Paul cast a "No Vote"

Border Tunnel Prevention Act of 2006

The Border Tunnel Prevention Act sought to impose a 20 year prison term on anyone building a tunnel to bring drugs or people across the border, and a 10 year term on anyone allowing a tunnel to be built on their property. The act passed almost unanimously in the House in roll call 469, but never came up for a vote in the Senate. Ron Paul voted in favor of the Border Tunnel Prevention Act of 2006.

Ron Paul voted in favor of the Border Tunnel Prevention Act of 2006.

Immigration Law Enforcement Act of 2006

In 2006, an effort was made to pass legislation (HR 6095) to give state and local law enforcement \"the inherent authority to investigate, identify, arrest, detain, or transfer to federal custody aliens in the United States\". The legislation also cracked down on smugglers of illegal immigrants. While the legislation passed the house on roll call 468 with bipartisan support, it was tabled in the Senate and never came to a vote. Ron Paul voted in favor of this legislation to enforce immigration laws in the US.

Ron Paul voted in favor of this legislation to enforce immigration laws in the US.

Secure Fence Act of 2006

Another piece of immigration law which actually passed in 2006 was called the Secure Fence Act of 2006 (HR 6061). The legislation was a series of requirements to monitor the border with both manpower and electronic surveillance. The legislation passed the house in roll call 446 with bi-partisan support. Ron Paul voted in favor of this legislation to secure the border.

Ron Paul voted in favor of this legislation to secure the border.

Border Protection, Antiterrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act of 2005

In 2005, the House passed the Border Protection, Antiterrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act of 2005. The act was an attempt to create a more secure border. The act passed the House in a 239-182 vote, but was not voted on in the Senate. Ron Paul voted in favor of this legislation.

Ron Paul voted in favor of this legislation.

Undocumented Alien Emergency Medical Assistance Amendments

The Undocumented Alien Emergency Medical Assistance Amendments was an attempt to amend the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 to impose conditions on Federal reimbursement of emergency health services furnished to undocumented aliens. The attempt failed in a 331-88 vote. Ron Paul voted in favor of the Undocumented Alien Emergency Medical Assistance Amendments.

Ron Paul voted in favor of the Undocumented Alien Emergency Medical Assistance Amendments.

 

Sponsored and Cosponsored Legislation

Session-111; Bill Number-H R 997; English Language Unity Act of 2009 - Cosponsor

Makes English the official language of the United States. Requires, subject to exceptions and rules of construction, that: (1) official functions of the United States be conducted in English; and (2) all naturalization ceremonies be conducted in English. Establishes a uniform English language rule for naturalization. Makes English language requirements and workplace policies, whether in the public or private sector, presumptively consistent with the laws of the United States.

Session-110; Bill Number-H R 997; English Language Unity Act of 2007 - Cosponsor

To declare English as the official language of the United States, to establish a uniform English language rule for naturalization, and to avoid misconstructions of the English language texts of the laws of the United States, pursuant to Congress' powers to provide for the general welfare of the United States and to establish a uniform rule of naturalization under article I, section 8, of the Constitution.

Session-110; Bill Number-H R 768; Limited English Assistance - Cosponsor

Declares Executive Order 13166, "Improving Access to Services for Persons with Limited English Proficiency," to be null and void.Prohibits the use of funds for the promulgation or enforcement of an executive order that creates an entitlement to services provided in a language other than English.

Session-110; Bill Number-h R 4464; Common Sense English Act - Cosponsor

Amends the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to declare that, notwithstanding any other provision of the equal employment opportunities provisions of the Act, it is not an unlawful employment practice for an employer to require employees to speak English while engaged in work.

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