Ron Paul on Illegal Drugs

Last Updated : Dec 06, 2011

Summary

Congressman Paul has stated that the federal government does not possess the authority to establish laws regulating drug possession, and that the federal government was not intended to fight a war on drugs. He has stated that he does not support drug use, but that the role of the federal government is not to regulate behavior. He supports state laws to regulate drugs as each state sees fit.

During the 2008 Presidential election Congressman Paul stated that if elected, he would pardon those in jail for non-violent drug crimes and end the war on drugs. He notes that allowing the safe purchase of drugs would end the drug cartels in other countries and lead to better prevention of drug use by minors as tobacco and alcohol are limited today. 

 

Not Congress's Duty to Regulate Behavior

In April of 1998, Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor about the possibility of random drug tests. He stated that random checks for drugs on a person could lead to random checks on that person's papers or telephones. He notes that it is not Congress's purpose to regulate behavior.

 

Never Intended that US Fight War on Drugs

In May of 1998, Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor and noted that the federal government was not intended to fight a war on drugs.

 

The War on Drugs and Columbia

In March of 2000, Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor and stated that the way we are fighting the war on drugs is wrong and should be rethought. He stated that in his opinion, the war on drugs was being used as an excuse for intervention in Columbia.

 

Unintended Consequences of the Drug War

In June of 2002, Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor about the unintended consequences of the War on Drugs.

 

No More Taxpayer Funding for Columbian Drug War

In May of 2002, Congressman Paul spoke in committee about his desire to end funding for the failed drug war in Columbia.

 

PBS Presidential Debate

In September of 2007, Congressman Paul stated in a PBS Presidential Debate that the war on drugs was a failure and should be ended.

 

South Carolina Debate

After the south Carolina Debate, Congressman Paul was interviewed and stated that he would pardon those convicted of non-violent drug crimes and end the war on drugs.

 

Campaign for Liberty

In September of 2008, Congressman Paul spoke at the Campaign for Liberty and discussed ending the drug war.

 

Pittsburgh Tribune Interview

In November of 2007, Congressman Paul was interviewed by the Pittsburgh Tribune and stated that he would end federal involvement in the drug war.

 

End the War on Drugs

In March of 2009, Congressman Paul issued a Texas Talk noting his desire to see the war on drugs ended.

 

Fair Sentencing Act

In July of 2010, Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor about the need to repeal the war on drugs. He discusses legislation the he had introduced to lessen sentencing disparities for Cocaine.

 

John Stossel Interview

In December of 2010, Congressman Paul was interviewed by John Stossel and spoke about ending federal laws dealing with drug use.

 

 

South Carolina Debate

In May of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the Republican debate in South Carolina. He talks about his views on the federal government addressing drug laws.

 

CNN National Security Debate

On November 22, 2011 Congressman Paul participated in the national security debate on CNN. In that debate, he stated that he would like to see the war on drugs ended. He stated that the federal war on drugs was a failure

 

Sponsored and Cosponsored Legislation

Session-107; Bill Number-H R 2592; States' Rights to Medical Marijuana Act - Cosponsor

Transfers marijuana from schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act to schedule II of such Act.Declares that, in a State in which marijuana may be prescribed or recommended by a physician for medical use under applicable State law, no provision of the Controlled Substances Act shall prohibit or otherwise restrict: (1) the prescription or recommendation of marijuana by a physician for medical use; (2) an individual from obtaining and using marijuana from a physician's prescription or recommendation of marijuana for medical use; or (3) a pharmacy from obtaining and holding marijuana for the prescription or recommendation of marijuana by a physician for medical use under applicable State law

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