Ron Paul on Health Care

Last Updated : Dec 13, 2011

Summary

Dr. Ron Paul believes that the problems facing the US health care system involve an over-involvement of government in health care, a flawed view of insurance by most Americans, third-party payers, an abundance of bureaucracy created by government and insurance agencies, and a need to reform the tort system.

In 2006, Congressman Paul noted that in 1973 Congress passed legislation establishing that all but the smallest companies must supply their employees with HMO options. He notes that while most people criticize HMOs, they don't realize they're the result of government requirements. He also notes this involvement by the government has led to the linking of health care and employment and establishes faulty practices such as allowing corporations to deduct health care costs, but not individuals.

During the 2008 campaign, Congressman Paul was vocal about the need for reform and his opposition to socialized medicine. He noted that this system has always failed. He also notes that the current system should be rejected. He notes that government involvement has led to inflation in the medical costs. As a solution, Congressman Paul supports health savings accounts, tax incentives for individuals, and allowing people to pay for their own health care and remove themselves from the third-party payer system of insurance and government involvement.

Congressman Paul has repeatedly asserted that although people have a right to their freedoms and a right to keep what they have earned, they don't have a right to stuff. Health care is a product and service provided by people. One group of people does not have the right to the labor of another. Health care is a good provided by people and is therefore not a right.

The current view of insurance is more of a prepaid service where people pay into a plan on a monthly basis and then receive care almost free of charge. Congressman Paul has asserted that the definition of insurance is an item that is purchased to offset risk. The risk people have is an accident such as a car wreck, a major surgery, or a major illness such as cancer, and insurance is purchased to offset those possibilities. He states that the flawed thinking that insurance should cover every illness and injury has led to a third payer system that is open to corruption and one of the greatest factors in driving up the price of health care.

Congressman Paul strongly opposed the 2009-2010 health care reform, noting that Congress should not attempt to solve every problem that the American people encounter and that the question should not be how the government can fix health care and not why government should fix health care. Congressman Paul asserted that the legislation was passed by relying on highly dubious budget predictions, faulty market assumptions, and outright fantasy. He notes that even if the plan were able to provide the services it promises to the people, it is still not affordable. Congressman Paul also noted that if the plan itself were so good, the government would not require thousands of new employees to ensure compliance, Americans would enter the program voluntarily. Congressman Paul also opposed the mandate to purchase insurance.

Congressman Paul also spoke out about the process used to pass the legislation and his opposition to deals which gave money to states in exchange for the votes of Senators. He also objected to the use of an Executive Order to ensure that no money from the plan went to pay for abortions. He asserted that Congress makes the law, not the President.

In addition to opposing the 2009-2010 health care reform, Congressman Paul also opposed the SCHIP reauthorization. He noted that greater government involvement in health care has never lowered costs.

Congressman Paul voted against the health care reform legislation each time it came up for a vote in the House. He voted against SCHIP reauthorization, and in favor of repealing the health care reform.

Congressman Paul has cosponsored legislation to repeal the health care reform, legislation to repeal the 1099 paperwork requirement imposed by the reform, and legislation to require that if a public system were enacted then all congressman must join the plan. Congressman Paul has also sponsored the "Private Option" for healthcare. This legislation would provide all Americans with a tax credit for 100 percent of health care expenses, allow for the purchase of insurance across state lines, allow for the rollover of money from flexible spending accounts or health savings accounts, remove the 7.5% threshold for tax deductions, and allow for easier importation of dugs.

As part of his 2012 health care plan, Congressman Paul has proposed the following items:

  • Allow purchase of health insurance across state lines.
  • Provide tax credits and deductions for all medical expenses.
  • Exempt those with terminal illnesses from the employee portion of payroll taxes while they are suffering from such illnesses or are incurring significant medical costs associated with their conditions.
  • Give a payroll deduction to any worker who is the primary caregiver for a spouse, parent, or child with a terminal illness.
  • Ensure that those harmed during medical treatment receive fair compensation while reducing the burden of costly malpractice litigation on the health care system by providing a tax credit for “negative outcomes” insurance purchased before medical treatment.
  • Guarantee that what is taken from taxpayers to pay for Medicare and Medicaid is not raided for other purposes.
  • Make all Americans eligible for Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) and remove government-imposed barriers to obtaining HSAs.
  • Stop the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) from interfering with Americans’ knowledge of and access to dietary supplements and alternative treatments.
  • Prevent federal bureaucrats from tracking every citizen’s medical history from cradle to grave by prohibiting the use of taxpayer funds for a national database of personal health information.

 

Controlling the Cost of Health Care

In August of 2006, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" to address the rising health care costs.

 

2008 Campaign Video

In May of 2007, Congressman Paul issued a campaign video to discuss health care. He addresses the role of corporations in the current system, the need for health savings accounts and choices, and government.

 

Kaiser Institute Interview

In September of 2007, Congressman Paul was interviewed by the Kaiser Institute on the subject of Health Care. He discusses the problems with the current system, the faulty viewpoint of insurance, and the over-involvement of government.

 

Congressional Control of Children's Health Care

In September of 2007, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" address to discuss the dangers of the government controlling children's health care.

 

Fighting Government Encroachment into Health Care

In May of 2009, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" address to discuss the need to fight the governments movement into the health care sector.

 

The Cost of Medicine

In June of 2009, Congressman Paul appeared on CNN and spoke about his opposition to the proposed plan, and his opposition to socialized medicine. He notes that government involvement raises health care costs. He states that many of the cost problems are a result of government involvement. Congressman Paul then addresses the faulty idea that insurance should pay for everything.

 

Health Care is a Good, Not a Right

In July of 2009, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" to discuss the fact that health care is not a right, but rather a commodity that must be purchased.

 

Campaign for Liberty Video

In July of 2009, Congressman Paul (an Obstetrician) spoke in a video about the health care system, what was wrong with it, and what is wrong with possible solutions. Within the video, Congressman Paul discusses how the increased involvement of government in health care has inflated the cost. He discusses the flawed definition of insurance in the medical industry and the rise of cost due to third party involvement.

In addition to discussing problems with the health care industry, Congressman Paul discusses the need to be able to opt out of any government program, and the need for tax cuts for health care.

  

Health Care Plan is Corporate Welfare

In August of 2009, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" to address the health care plan in Congress. He refers to it as "corporate welfare."

 

Health Care Plan Based on Fantasy

In August of 2009, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" address to speak about the health care plan being considered in Congress. He states that the plan is based on economic fantasy.

 

Competition with the Government

In November of 2009, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" address to discuss why no entity can ever fully compete with a government funded program.

 

Floor Speech - Health Care

In September of 2009, Congressman Paul spoke on House floor about health care. He address the belief that health care is a right, discusses the role of government in health care and debasing the currency, and the tax code.

 

Freedom and Bureaucracy

In December of 2009, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" address to discuss the bureaucracy that will be formed by the new government health care program.

 

Health Care Reform is a Lump of Coal

In December of 2009, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" to address the passage of health care reform in the Senate.

 

Health Care and Economic Realities

In March of 2010, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" address to discuss the passage of the health care reform and what he called outright fantasy used to pass the legislation.

 

Dismantling of the Constitution

In March of 2010, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" to note the passage of the health care reform legislation through congress. Congressman Paul stated that it was a further dismantling of the Constitution.

 

CNN Interview

In March of 2010, Congressman Paul appeared on John King's Show on CNN. He discussed the inability of government to provide services as well as private entities, and then he addressed the belief that health care is a right.

 

Health Care will Drive the US to Bankruptcy

After the passage of health care reform in 2010, Congressman Paul appeared on RT and was asked about health care. He responds to a question about the right of health care and then states that the passed legislation will drive the country towards bankruptcy, is not viable, and will eventually be repealed because of this. 

 

Discussion of Process

In March of 2010, Congressman Paul appeared on Fox Business and discussed the procedural issues with the health care reform problem, and he again discussed the faulty belief that people have a right to health care. He also discussed the repeal of health care and that bankruptcy would be what finally ended government health care. When the discussion turned to abortion provisions in the legislation, Congressman Paul noted the futility of the Hyde amendment and that the real problem was that government is too involved in health care.

  

 

If it was a good program, you wouldn't need coercion

In March of 2010, Congressman Paul appeared on Fox Business to discuss the health care reform legislation that has just passed Congress. He noted that if it was such a good program and everyone would like it, it wouldn't require an army of additional bureaucrats to enforce the law and force people into the system.

 

Executive Order on Abortion

In March of 2010, President Obama signed an executive order to prevent government funding of abortions through the 2009-2010 health care reform legislation. Congressman Paul discussed the issue on Fox News and noted the unconstitutionality of the President issuing a law through executive decree.

 

The Private Option

In May of 2010, Congressman Paul used his "Texas Talk" address to discuss the need to remove government from the health care equation and proposed what he called a "private option."

 

Ending the Mandate

In April of 2010, Congressman Paul put forth legislation to end the mandate in the 2009-2010 health care reform legislation. In May of 2010, the Congressman used his "Texas Talk" address to discuss the legislation and the need to end the mandate.

In June of 2010, Congressman Paul released a press statement noting his support for legislation to end the mandate in health care reform.

 

South Carolina Debate

In May of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the Republican debate in South Carolina. He talks about his views on tort reform and medical reform.

 

New Hampshire Debate

In June of 2010, Congressman Paul participated in the Republican Primary debate in New Hampshire. He was asked about Medicare and it's solvency. He notes that the average couple gets much more out of the system than they put into it and it cannot be made solvent without revamping it. He argued for allowing people to opt out of the system.

 

Iowa Debate

In August of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the Presidential debate in Ames, Iowa. He was asked about the constitutionality of an individual mandate and stated that he saw no authority in the constitution for the mandate. He also supports health care savings accounts.

 

Reagan Library Debate

In September of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the Republican debate at the Reagan Library. He spoke about health care and mandates.

 

TEA Party Debate

In September of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the TEA party debate for the Republican primary. He is asked a number of health care related questions and states that he would not immediately end Medicare part D, and discusses personal responsibiity and health care.

 

The Western Debate

In October of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the Western Debate in Las Vegas. He was asked if there was any part of Obamacare that he would support. He said that he supported no growth or intrusion into the health care market.

 

Michigan Economic Debate

On November 10, 2011 Congressman Paul participated in the Michigan Economic Debate. He was asked about Obamacare and discussed the need to remove the government from the market.

 

2012 Presidential Campaign Website Statements

 

Voting Record

Tort Reform

In March of 2012, the House voted on HR 5, also know as the Help Efficient, Accessible, Low Cost, Timely Healthcare (HEALTH) Act of 2011. This legislation would have set a statute of limitations of three years after the date of manifestation of an injury or one year after the claimant discovers the injury for a lawsuit, made each party liable only for the amount of damages directly proportional to such party's percentage of responsibility, allowed the court to restrict the payment of attorney contingency fees, authorized punitive damages only where there is clear and convincing evidence that a person acted with malicious intent to injure the claimant, limited punitive damages to $500,000, limited noneconomic damages to $250,000, and denied punitive damages in the case of products approved, cleared, or licensed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), or otherwise considered in compliance with FDA standards. Ron Paul cast a "No Vote"

Repeal of Health Care Reform

In early 2011, the House voted on repealing the 2009-2010 health care reform legislation, called "Obamacare" by its opponents. Ron Paul voted in favor of repealing the health care legislation.

Ron Paul voted in favor of repealing the health care legislation.

2009-2010 Health Care Reform - Amendments

There were three significant votes on the health care reform legislation in the house. The first passed the house version, the second passed the reconciliation bill, and the third passed a bill to address "problems" in the original bills. This vote passed amendments to address the problems with the reconciliation bill. Ron Paul voted against the health care amendments for the House and Senate bills.

Ron Paul voted against the health care amendments for the House and Senate bills.

Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010

In March of 2010 the House voted on the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010. The legislation was to pass the health care reform through the reconciliation process. No Republicans voted for the legislation and 22 Democrats voted against the bill. The bill passed 220-207. Ron Paul voted against the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.

Ron Paul voted against the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.

2009-2010 Health Care Reform - Reconciliation

After a separate version of health care reform passed in the Senate, the Democrats lost the 60 seats they needed to break a Republican filibuster. To pass the reform bill, the House passed a reconciliation bill that would allow the House and Senate versions to be combined without a separate verion passing the Senate. Ron Paul voted against the health care reconciliation bill.

Ron Paul voted against the health care reconciliation bill.

2009-2010 Health Care Reform Bill

The Affordable Health Care for America Act (HR 3962) was the version that passed the House. It was supported by most Democrats and only 1 Republican. Ron Paul voted against the original health care reform bill.

Ron Paul voted against the original health care reform bill.

Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act

The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act sets up health requirements for tobacco products, sets labeling guidelines, requires tobacco companies to report the content of their products, and prescribes punishements for violating any rules. The measure passed the House 298-112. Ron Paul voted against the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act.

Ron Paul voted against the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act.

SCHIP

In addition to attempting overall health care reform, congress re-authorized SCHIP in 2009. SCHIP is a program to provide children with health care and fund it through tobacco taxes. The program passed with the full support of Democrats and roughly 1/4 of the Republicans. Ron Paul voted against SCHIP.

Ron Paul voted against SCHIP.

Medicare Part D - Final Vote

After the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 passed the Senate, it came back for a final vote in the House. It passed the House in final form 220-215. Ron Paul voted against medicare part D when it passed the House in final form.

Ron Paul voted against medicare part D when it passed the House in final form.

Medicare Part D

The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 is sometimes called Medicare Part D. It was a sweeping reform that created plans for the senior citizens to purchase prescription drugs. The bill iniitially passed the House 216-215. Ron Paul cast a "No Vote"

 

Sponsored and Cosponsored Legislation

Session-112; Bill Number-H R 2; Repealing the Job-Killing Health Care Law Act - Cosponsor

Repeals the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, effective as of its enactment. Restores provisions of law amended by such Act. Repeals the health care provisions of the Health Care and Education and Reconciliation Act of 2010, effective as of the Act's enactment. Restores provisions of law amended by the Act's health care provisions.

Session-112; Bill Number-H R 38; To rescind funds appropriated to the Health Insurance Reform Implementation Fund under the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 - Cosponsor

Rescinds any unobligated balance of funds made available for the Health Insurance Reform Implementation Fund under the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010

Session-112; Bill Number-H R 144; Small Business Paperwork Mandate Elimination Act of 2011 - Cosponsor

Amends the Internal Revenue Code to repeal a provision (added by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) that extends to corporations that are not tax-exempt the requirement to report payments of $600 or more.

Session-112; Bill Number-H R 369; Health Savings and Affordability Act of 2011 - Cosponsor

Amends the Internal Revenue Code to: (1) allow a tax deduction from gross income for the cost of health insurance coverage for individual taxpayers, their spouses, and dependents; (2) permit holders of health savings accounts (HSAs) and their spouses who are age 55 or older to make additional (catch-up) contributions to a joint HSA; (3) increase the allowable amount of the tax deduction for contributions to HSAs; (4) combine individual and family deductibles under high deductible health insurance plans; (5) allow for increased rollovers from flexible spending arrangements (FSAs) or health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs) into HSAs; (6) allow the payment of premiums from HSAs for high deductible health plans; and (7) treat as medical care for purposes of the tax deduction for medical expenses certain exercise equipment and fees for physical fitness programs.

Session-111; Bill Number-H R 5141; Small Business Paperwork Mandate Elimination Act - Cosponsor

Amends the Internal Revenue Code to repeal a provision (added by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) that extends to corporations that are not tax-exempt the requirement to report payments of $600 or more.

Session-111; Bill Number-H Res 1188; Ensuring an up or down vote on certain health care legislation - Cosponsor

Prohibits the Committee on Rules from reporting a rule or order that provides for disposition of the Senate amendments to H.R. 3590 (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [PPACA]) unless it provides for: (1) at least one hour of debate, equally divided and controlled by the majority leader and the minority leader; and (2) a requirement that the Speaker put the question on disposition of the Senate amendments and that the yeas and nays be considered as ordered thereon.

Session-111; Bill Number-H R 5111; To amend the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to modify special rules relating to coverage of abortion services under such Act. - Cosponsor

Amends the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to prohibit federal funds from being to used to cover any part of the costs of any health plan that includes coverage of abortion services. (Currently, federal funds cannot be used for abortion services and plans receiving federal funds must keep federal funds segregated from any funds for abortion services.) Requires any qualified health benefit plan offered through an Exchange that includes coverage for abortions to also offer a qualified health benefit plan through the Exchange that is identical in every respect except that it does not cover abortions.

Session-111; Bill Number-H R 4972; To repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - Cosponsor

Repeals the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, effective as of its enactment. Restores provisions of law amended by such Act.

Session-111; Bill Number-H Res 615; Congressman and the Public Option - Cosponsor

Urges Members of Congress who vote in favor of the establishment of a public, federal government run health insurance option to forgo their right to participate in the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) and agree to enroll under that public option.

Session-110; Bill Number-H R 3234; HSA Improvement and Expansion Act of 2007 - Cosponsor

Amends Internal Revenue Code provisions relating to health savings accounts (HSAs) to: (1) allow HSAs to incorporate flexible spending and health reimbursement arrangements; (2) increase the annual HSA contribution limitation; (3) permit the use of HSAs to purchase health insurance; (4) allow the payment of certain medical expenses incurred before the establishment of an HSA; (5) allow veterans eligible for service-connected disability benefits to establish an HSA; and (6) allow spouses to make increased catch-up contributions to a single HSA.

Session-109; Bill Number-H R 5743; HSA Improvement and Expansion Act of 2006 - Cosponsor

Amends Internal Revenue Code provisions relating to health savings accounts (HSAs) to: (1) allow a one-time, tax-free transfer of balances in employer flexible spending arrangements, health reimbursement arrangements, and individual retirement accounts to HSAs; (2) revise HSA eligibility criteria for spouses covered by flexible spending arrangements, individuals over age 65 automatically enrolled in Medicare part A, and veterans receiving medical benefits; (3) increase contribution limits for HSAs; (4) allow payment of high deductible health insurance premiums from HSAs; and (5) allow payment from an HSA of certain medical expenses incurred before the establishment of such HSA.

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