Ron Paul on Gay Marriage

Last Updated : Sep 19, 2011

Summary

Morally, Congressman Paul believes that marriage is between a man and a woman. He has noted on numerous times that to have a discussion concerning the definition of something already defined is not a proper function of any government. He has noted that states did not create the idea of marriage, but rather recently began to issue licenses for health reasons. He notes that most people view their marriage day as being joined in the eyes of their creator and not in the eyes of the state.

Legally, Congressman Paul has noted that marriage is not an issue for the federal government. While not in office at the time of the vote, Congressman Paul has stated that he would not support an amendment to define marriage as that is not a function of the federal government. 

In keeping with his views on federalism, Congressman Paul supports the Marriage Protection Act. This legislation ensures federal courts will not undermine any state laws regulating marriage by forcing a state to recognize same-sex marriage licenses issued in another state. The Marriage Protection Act thus ensures that the authority to regulate marriage remains with individual states and communities, as the drafters of the Constitution intended.

 

The Federal Marriage Amendment Is a Very Bad Idea

In October of 2003, Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor noting his views in the Federal Marriage Amendment.

 

Protecting Marriage from Judicial Tyranny

In July of 2004, Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor about the Marriage Protection Act and gay marriage in general.

 

New Hampshire Meet and Greet

In July of 2007, Congressman Paul spoke at a New Hampshire meet and greet during the Presidential race. He was asked about gay marriage and spoke about marriage licenses from the state and his belief that the federal government has no role. (comments start at 6:10)

 

Presidential Debate

During a 2008 Presidential Debate, Congressman Paul was asked about gay marriage. He is asked about gay marriage and discusses his view that government should be out of marriage. He is also asked about his support for the Defense of Marriage Act and notes that it defends the states's abilitites to determine marriage.

 

South Carolina Debate

In May of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the Republican debate in South Carolina. He spoke about his desire to end the war inAfghanistan.

 

New Hampshire Debate

In June of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the Presidential debate in New Hampshire. He was asked about gay marriage, a constitutional amendment, and don't ask, don't tell.

 

Iowa Debate

In August of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the Presidential debate in Ames, Iowa. He was asked about gay marriage and stated that the government should not be involved in marriage, and that no one should be allowed to force their view on marriage onto anyone else.

Voting Record

Don't Ask, Don't Tell

In 2010, the House voted to overturn the policy of don't ask, don't tell. Ron Paul voted in favor of repealing Don't Ask, Don't Tell.

Ron Paul voted in favor of repealing Don't Ask, Don't Tell.

Constitutional Amendment

In 2006 and 2004, the House voted on adding a constitutional amendment to establish that marriage shall consist of one man and one woman. It sought to ensure that no measure enacted in one state could be enforced in another state. The measures failed in both 2006 and 2004 with the support of most Republicans and the opposition of most Democrats. Ron Paul voted against the 2006 constitutional amendment attempt.

Ron Paul voted against the 2006 constitutional amendment attempt.

Constitutional Amendment

In 2006 and 2004, the House voted on adding a constitutional amendment to establish that marriage shall consist of one man and one woman. It sought to ensure that no measure enacted in one state could be enforced in another state. The measures failed in both 2006 and 2004 with the support of most Republicans and the opposition of most Democrats. Ron Paul voted against the 2004 constitutional amendment attempt.

Ron Paul voted against the 2004 constitutional amendment attempt.

Marriage Protection Act of 2004

The Marriage Protection Act of 2004 sought to ensure that no State shall be required to give effect to any marriage between persons of the same sex under the laws of any other State. Although the bill passed the house in roll call 410, it was not voted on in the US Senate. Ron Paul cast a "No Vote"

 

Sponsored and Cosponsored Legislation

Session-111; Bill Number-H R 1269; Marriage Protection Act of 2009 - Cosponsor

Amends the federal judicial code to deny federal courts jurisdiction to hear or decide any question pertaining to the interpretation of, or the validity under the Constitution, of the provision of the Defense of Marriage Act declaring that no state shall be required to give effect to any marriage between persons of the same sex under the laws of any other state.

Session-110; Bill Number-H R 724; Marriage Protection Act of 2007 - Cosponsor

To amend title 28, United States Code, to limit Federal court jurisdiction over questions under the Defense of Marriage Act.

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