Ron Paul on Education

Last Updated : Dec 13, 2011

Summary

Congressman Paul believes that the federal government does not have the constitutional authority to create and maintain a national education system and that the department of education should be mostly dissolved. He supports vouchers over the current system, but favors school systems being run by local governments. He is an advocate of home-schooling.

In 1988, Congressman Paul stated in an interview that the federal government should be removed from education and a private school system should be enacted. He cited the poor track record for government involvement in education and the lack of legal authority. He notes that ending the public school system all together would be difficult and called for a voucher system to allow students to select their schools.

Also in 1988, Congressman Paul spoke in favor of legislation to prohibit the executive branch from enacting a national testing standard. He noted that even though he supported legislation to prevent the creation of a national test without congressional approval, he notes that that education is not a power granted to the federal government and they have no authority to intervene.

Again in 1999, Congressmen Paul noted that the doctrine of enumerated powers stated that the federal government powers were limited to those areas designated to it by the federal government and education was not one of those areas. He also notes that the course being taken by the government to address education was failing.

In 2001, Congressman Paul introduced legislation to extend HOPE Scholarships to K-12 to allow them to be used to pay for private or parochial schools or to offset the cost of home-schooling.

In 2002, Congressman Paul reasserted his views that vouchers were a better solution than mandatory public school. He argued that vouchers for parochial schools did not violate the separation of church and state, and that anything that created more competition would be good for education.

In 2008, Congressman Paul voiced his criticism for the success of the public school system in support of the public school system.

In 2011, Congressman Paul argued against government loans for college noting that this was not the role of the government. He stated that no one had the moral or legal right to take money from one person to loan or give to another person for the purposes of education. He stated that education was simply not a right, but rather something that should be purchased.

While in office, Congressman Paul has voted against No Child Left Behind and against the DC Scholarship program. 

 

Federal Government and Public Education

In a 1988 interview, Congressman Paul spoke about the failure of the federal education system, support for vouchers and/or tax credits to establish competition.

 

Education Not an Area Designated to the Federal Government

In February of 1998 Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor about his opposition to the President attempting to use executive authority to establish a national testing standard through executive power only.

 

National Testing and the Educational Crisis

In April of 1998, Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor about the educational crisis and legislation that he was introducing to remove taxes from earnings made through educational processes for educational purposes.

 

Student Results Act of 1999

In October of 1999, Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor about his opposition to the Student Results Act of 1999. Congressman Paul notes the lack of success in the federal education system, and states that our approach to education is not working.

 

 

Hope

In June of 2001, Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor and introduced two pieces of legislation. One would provide HOPE Scholarships to K-12 for use is private or parochial schools or to offset the cost of home-schooling.

 

Voucher Debate and Public Education

In a February 25, 2002 article, Congressman Paul wrote about the failure of the federal education system, the lack of the constitutional authority for a federal education system, and support for vouchers.

 

Campaign Speech on Home Schooling

During the 2008 Presidential election, Congressman Paul spoke about home schooling and the public education system.

  

Education Is Not a Right

In March of 2011 Congressman Paul appeared on MSNBC and stated that the federal government should not be involved in granting loans to students. Congressman Paul notes that there is not right to an education and that if someone desires an education they should work to pay for that schooling. 

 

Fox News / Google Debate

On September of 2011, Congressman Paul participated in the Fox News / Google debate. He is asked education and notes his support for removing the federal government from that role.

 

Michigan Economic Debate

On November 10, 2011 Congressman Paul participated in the Michigan Economic Debate. He was asked about Obamacare and discussed the need to remove the government from the market.

 

Campaign Website Statements

 

2012 Presidential Campaign Website Statements

 

 

Voting Record

America COMPETES Reauthorization Act

In May of 2010 the House voted on reauthorizing the America COMPETES Act. The act passed the House 262-150. Ron Paul voted against reauthorizing the America COMPETES Act.

Ron Paul voted against reauthorizing the America COMPETES Act.

College Cost Reduction and Access Act

The College Cost Reduction and Access Act is a significant education bill dealing largely with funding for higher education. The bill removes tuition sensitivity for Pell Grants, increases the amount available for Pell grants, Funds the Upward Bound program, establishes the TEACH Grants, reduces student loan repayment rates, sets deferments based on need and establishes some partner based grants. The bill got the full support of the Democrats, but passed with the support of only about 1/4 of the Republicans. Ron Paul voted against the College Cost Reduction and Access Act.

Ron Paul voted against the College Cost Reduction and Access Act.

No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

No Child Left Behind was the primary focus of the Bush administration prior to 9/11. The bill requires states to develop assessments in basic skills to be given to all students in certain grades, if those states are to receive federal funding for schools. The Act does not assert a national achievement standard; standards are set by each individual state. The bill got the support of most Democrats and Republicans and passed the House in a 384-45 vote. Ron Paul voted against the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.

Ron Paul voted against the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.

DC Scholarship Program

In 1998, the House voted on an amendment to the yearly appropriations bill to Washington D.C.. The amendment allocated $7 Million dollars to a program for scholarships to low-income children. The amendment was ' agreed to with the support of most Republicans and most Democrats. Ron Paul voted against the DC Scholarship Program.

Ron Paul voted against the DC Scholarship Program.

Education Savings and School Excellence Act of 1998

This 1998 legislation would have allowed people to take money from their IRAs to pay for qualified elementary and secondary education expenses, including home schooling expenses. It increased the annual contribution limit from $500 to $2,000. It permits corporations to contribute to education IRAs. Although the bill passed both the house and the Senate, it was vetoed by the President. Ron Paul voted against the Education Savings and School Excellence Act of 1998.

Ron Paul voted against the Education Savings and School Excellence Act of 1998.

 

Sponsored and Cosponsored Legislation

Session-110; Bill Number-H R 1539; Academic Partnerships Lead Us to Success Act or the A PLUS Act - Cosponsor

Allows each state to submit to the Secretary of Education a declaration of intent, applicable for up to five years, permitting it to receive federal funds on a consolidated basis that would otherwise be directed toward specific programs furthering the stated purpose of title I (Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. Requires each declaration to be formulated by a combination of specified State Authorizing Officials or by referendum, and list the programs for which consolidated funding is requested. Allows states to use such funds for any educational purpose permitted by state law, but requires states to make certain assurances that they will use fiscal control and fund accounting procedures, abide by federal civil rights laws, and advance educational opportunities for the disadvantaged. Allows states to amend their declarations. Requires each declaration state to: (1) inform the public of its student achievement assessment system and annually report on student progress toward the state's proficiency standards, disaggregating performance data by specified student groups; and (2) keep aggregate spending on elementary and secondary education at no less than 90% of such spending for the school year coinciding with this Act's enactment. Limits administrative expenses. Requires consolidated funds to be distributed in a manner that allows for the equitable, as determined by each state, participation of private schools.

Session-110; Bill Number-H R 3177; Local Education Authority Returns Now Act - Cosponsor

Requires the Secretary of the Treasury to make an annual determination of states that have chosen to opt-out of K-12 education grant programs.Requires the Secretary of Education to determine credits due to states as opt-out state education amounts.Amends the Internal Revenue Code to allow individual taxpayers in states that opt-out a refundable tax credit for a share of the opt-out amount creditable to such states.

Session-110; Bill Number-H R 6400; State Temporary Economic Priority (STEP) Act - Cosponsor

Authorizes states to transfer or consolidate funds made available to them under certain federal transportation, education, and job training programs: (1) beginning with the calendar quarter after the United States experiences economic growth at an annual rate of less than 1% for two consecutive calendar quarters; and (2) continuing until 18 months after it experiences economic growth at an annual rate of 1% or more for two consecutive calendar quarters.

Session-111; Bill Number-H R 1717; Academic Partnerships Lead Us to Success Act or the A PLUS Act - Cosponsor

Allows each state to submit to the Secretary of Education a declaration of intent, applicable for up to five years, permitting it to receive federal funds on a consolidated basis that would otherwise be directed toward specific programs furthering the stated purpose of title I (Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. Requires each declaration to be formulated by a combination of specified State Authorizing Officials or by referendum, and list the programs for which consolidated funding is requested. Allows states to use such funds for any educational purpose permitted by state law, but requires them to make certain assurances that they will use fiscal control and fund accounting procedures, abide by federal civil rights laws, and advance educational opportunities for the disadvantaged. Allows states to amend their declarations. Requires each declaration state to: (1) inform the public of its student achievement assessment system and report annually on student progress toward the state's proficiency standards, disaggregating performance data by specified student groups; and (2) keep aggregate spending on elementary and secondary education at no less than 90% of such spending for the school year coinciding with this Act's enactment. Limits administrative expenses. Requires consolidated funds to be distributed in a manner that allows for the equitable participation of private schools.

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