Ron Paul on China

Last Updated : Mar 28, 2011

Summary

Congressman Paul's overall view on the United State's relationship with China is the same as his views towards other countries. Congressman Paul believes that we should have fair and open trade with the country, that we should not carry out overt or covert, military or economic actions against the country and should not allow China to do the same against us.

In 2001, a controversy erupted when 24 airmen were captured by the Chinese government when the spy plane they were flying was forced to land due to contact with a Chinese military plane. Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor and asked if such flights were necessary today with the prominence of satellite technology. He asked how the US would feel if the Chinese were flying spy planes off the US coast.

When responding to the spy plane incident, Congressman Paul also spoke about the Taiwan Relations Act. He stated that this act essentially committed the US to war at any time in the future to protect Taiwan interests. Congressman Paul claimed that this open-ended commitment to was was not constitutional, and that one generation could not commit future generations to war.

in the speech relating to the spy plane, Congressman Paul also briefly addressed the trade imbalance. He stated that despite a trade imbalance in their favor, the US subsidizes numerous Chinese industries through the Export/Import Bank. In 2006, Congressman Paul introduced an amendment to end the $4 billion subsidy to this bank, which underwrites the purchases of goods and services by the Chinese government and others. He noted that many US businesses benefit from this arrangement. Congressman Paul has continued stating his desire to end this subsidy in related speeches.

In addressing the trade imbalance, Congressman Paul has warned against protectionist efforts to lower the imbalance. He notes that US consumers benefit from lower prices, and that trade should be encouraged and not discouraged as nations that trade heavily have a disincentive to fight wars. While Congressman Paul notes that the trade imbalance is indeed a problem that must be addressed, he notes that the issue will not be addressed successfully until the currency manipulation issues are addressed.

When addressing the topic of China's currency manipulation, in 2005 Congressman Paul noted that the Japanese yen’s value has more than tripled since the breakdown of the Bretton Woods system without significant effect on the trade imbalance. He has argued against resolutions and other items condemning Chinese currency manipulation as antagonistic and ultimately ineffective. He states that the real problem is not China's manipulation of their currency, but the overall use of fiat currency of the world that allows for such manipulation by removing the backing of the currencies with precious metals. Congressman Paul notes that if the US currency were first addressed, China's currency manipulation would be pointless.

Congressman Paul has stated that China has real human rights issues that need to be addressed and that the country has a long to come in establishing full liberty. However, he objects the idea that perceived human rights violations in one country are matters of legitimate concerns for other nations. 

 

A New China Policy

In April of 2001, Congressman Paul released a statement noting the return of 24 Americans from China and the President's handling of that matter. He then discusses our overall policy on China. This statement mirrors a floor speech by Congressman Paul.

 

US Trade Rights Enforcement Act

In July of 2005 Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor about his opposition to the United States Trade Rights Enforcement Act.

 

Your Taxes Subsidize China

In August of 2006, Congressman Paul issued a statement  as part of his Texas Talk series noting that the US subsidizes China with billions of dollars each year. He notes that while many politicians talk tough about China, few seem willing to do anything about it.

 

Chinese Currency Manipulation

In May of 2007, Congressman Paul spoke in Committee about the Chinese manipulation of currency.

 

HR 1370

In July of 2008, Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor concerning a resolution condemning China for human rights violations. He notes that the US House has no authority over China and that the US itself stands accused of human rights violations.

 

Currency Reform for Fair Trade Act

In September of 2010, Congressman Paul issued a statement noting his floor speech on the Currency Reform for Fair Trade Act.

 

Comments on Nobel Prize Winner

In December of 2010, Congressman Paul spoke on the House floor about his opposition to a resolution condemning Chinese actions relating to the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize Winner.

 

We Can't Blame China

In January of 2011, Congressman Paul appeared on CNN and discussed China and currency manipulation. Congressman Paul notes that while China is manipulating it's currency, so is the US. He notes that the problems causing the trade imbalance are US policies making it difficult for the US to compete and not China's policies.

 

Voting Record

Currency Reform for Fair Trade Act

In September of 2010 the House voted on the Currency Reform for Fair Trade Act to address the Chinese manipulation of currency. The bill passed the house 348-79. Ron Paul voted against the Currency Manipulation for fair Trade Act.

Ron Paul voted against the Currency Manipulation for fair Trade Act.

China - Human Rights Abuses

In July of 2008, the House voted on a resolution calling on the Government of the Peoples Republic of China to immediately end abuses of the human rights of its citizens, to cease repression of Tibetan and Uighur citizens, and to end its support for the Government of Sudan and Burma to ensure that the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games take place in an atmosphere of freedom. The amendment passed 419-1. Ron Paul voted against the resolution.

Ron Paul voted against the resolution.

Resolution - China and Tibet

In April of 2008, the House voted on a resolution calling on the Government of the Peoples Republic of China to end its crackdown in Tibet and to enter into a substantive dialogue with His Holiness the Dalai Lama to find a negotiated solution that respects the distinctive language, culture, religious identity, and fundamental freedom of all Tibetans. The amendment passed 413-1. Ron Paul voted against the resolution on China and Tibet.

Ron Paul voted against the resolution on China and Tibet.

Resolution - Financial Services

Calling on the Government of the Peoples Republic of China to remove barriers to United States financial services firms doing business in China. The resolution passed 401-4. Ron Paul cast a "No Vote"

Resolution - Forced Labor Prisons

Calling on the international community to condemn the Laogai, the system of forced labor prison camps in the Peoples Republic of China, as a tool for suppression maintained by the Chinese Government. The resolution passed 413-1. Ron Paul voted against the resolution on forced labor prisons.

Ron Paul voted against the resolution on forced labor prisons.

Resolution - EU and Chinese Embargo

In February of 2005, the House voted on a resolution expressing the strong concern of the House of Representatives that the European Union may end its embargo against the Peoples Republic of China. The resolution passed 411-3. Ron Paul voted against the resolution.

Ron Paul voted against the resolution.

Resolution - Intellectual Property

In July of 2004, the House voted on a resolution urging the Government of the Peoples Republic of China to improve its protection of intellectual property rights, and for other purposes. The resolution passed 416-3. Ron Paul voted in favor of the resolution on intellectual property.

Ron Paul voted in favor of the resolution on intellectual property.

Resolution - Trade Agreements

To encourage the Peoples Republic of China to fulfill its commitments under international trade agreements, support the United States manufacturing sector, and establish monetary and financial market reforms. The resolution passed 411-1. Ron Paul voted against the resolution on trade agreements.

Ron Paul voted against the resolution on trade agreements.

Disapproving Normal Trade Relations for China

In July of 2001, the House voted on a resolution disapproving of establishing normal trade relations with China. The measure failed 269-259. Ron Paul voted against the resolution to disapprove of normal trade relations with China.

Ron Paul voted against the resolution to disapprove of normal trade relations with China.

To Authorize Extension of Nondiscriminatory Treatment (Normal Trade Relations Treatment) to the Peoples Republic of China

In May of 2000, the House voted on extending normal trade relations with China. The measure passed 237-197. Ron Paul voted against granting most favored nation status.

Ron Paul voted against granting most favored nation status.

 

Sponsored and Cosponsored Legislation

This representative has not been identified as sponsoring or cosponsoring significant legislation related to this title.

User Comments