Carol Shea-Porter on Homeland Security

Last Updated : Oct 01, 2010

Campaign Website Statements

Civil Liberties

The founders of our country fought to create a nation "conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal." The colonists had vivid memories of the absolute rulers of Europe, who stood above the law, and who could confiscate property and imprison, deport, or execute any individual at will. With this in mind, they wrote a Constitution designed to protect Americans from such abuses of power.

The 4th Amendment to the Constitution defines the right of all Americans to be "secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures..."

Article One, Section Nine of the Constitution guarantees the right of habeas corpus-which says that people cannot be detained indefinitely without due process of law. Thomas Jefferson called habeas corpus one of the "essential principles of our government."

New Hampshire has always understood the value of our basic freedoms. I've taken that spirit with me to Washington, where it is needed now as much as it was two hundred years ago.

Even as we fight to defend the principles of freedom abroad, we must also continue to fight to protect our own liberties here at home.

 

Voting Record

Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2010

In October of 2010, the House voted on a funding bill for Homeland Security. Buried within that legislation was language to prevent any funds from being used to transfer detainees from Guantanamo Bay to the US or to their home nation. Also in that funding bill was a definition that made photos taken of prisoners at Guantanamo bay classified and unable to be released. The act passed the House 258-163. Carol Shea-Porter voted in favor of the act which prevented the movement of prisoners from Gitmo and classified photos of detainees.

Carol Shea-Porter voted in favor of the act which prevented the movement of prisoners from Gitmo and classified photos of detainees.

FISA Amendment Acts of 2008

In June of 2008, the House voted on the FISA Amendment Acts of 2008. The legislation passed the House with bipartisan support 293-129, but was never raised in the Senate. The legislation primarily contained provisions to allow for the monitoring of terrorists overseas that were a continuation of expired provisions in the Protect America Act. It also granted immunity to telecommunications companies against their customers for giving information to the government without a warrant. Carol Shea-Porter voted against the FISA Amendment Acts of 2008.

Carol Shea-Porter voted against the FISA Amendment Acts of 2008.

Protect America Act of 2007

The Protect America Act of 2007 was a bill that sought to allow electronic surveillance of people reasonable believed to be outside of the United States. The bill lists the requirements for initiating surveillance and gives it a 1 year limitation. The bill passed in the House in a 227-183 vote. Carol Shea-Porter voted against the Protect America Act of 2007.

Carol Shea-Porter voted against the Protect America Act of 2007.

 

Sponsored and Cosponsored Legislation

Session-111; Bill Number-H R 893; American Anti-Torture Act of 2009 - Cosponsor

Amends the Detainee Treatment Act of 2005 to prohibit any person in the custody or control of the United States (under current law, the Department of Defense) from being subject to any treatment or technique of interrogation not authorized by and listed in the U.S. Army Field Manual on Human Intelligence Collector Operations. Makes such prohibition inapplicable with respect to any person in the custody or control of the United States (under current law, the Department of Defense) pursuant to a U.S. criminal or immigration law.

Session-110; Bill Number-H R 4114; American Anti-Torture Act of 2007 - Cosponsor

Amends the Detainee Treatment Act of 2005 to prohibit any person in the custody or control of the United States (under current law, the Department of Defense) from being subject to any treatment or technique of interrogation not authorized by and listed in the U.S. Army Field Manual on Intelligence Interrogation.

Session-110; Bill Number-H R 2826; Habeas Corpus for Detainees - Cosponsor

To amend titles 28 and 10, United States Code, to restore habeas corpus for individuals detained by the United States at Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and for other purposes.

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