Doug Lamborn on Education

Last Updated : Nov 02, 2012

Summary

Senatory Casey is a strong supporter of government programs to pay for childhood education, feeding, and care from birth through high school. He supports "universal feeding" to allow schools to feed every student at no cost to any student, and supports a wide range programs to provide assistance to families for childcare and pre-K programs.

Subsidized Pre-K

In 2007, Senator Casey offered an amendment to the budget resolution to create a reserve fund for early childhood education. He stated that this was intended to meet a campaign plan to provide universal access to early childhood education for four-year olds. Specifically, the amendment would create a deficit-neutral reserve fund to open the door for future legislation to help states expand access to early childhood education. The fund would be used to provide assistance to states to offer free or subsidized preschool programs for low-income families.

Benefits of Early Education

When participating in a committee on the benefits of early education in 2007, Senator Casey discussed the need to provide early education to all children and the benefits of that education. Specifically, Senator Casey asserted that high quality early education and development programs significantly improve children’s outcomes, that high quality early education programs have a positive impact on state and federal budgets, that high quality early education strengthens the economy, and that investing in high quality child care assistance also strengthens the economy.

Put School Counselors Where They’re Needed Act

In 2008, Senator Casey introduced the Put School Counselors Where They’re Needed Act. That legislation would require the Secretary of Education to create a demonstration project under which the Secretary makes grants available on a competitive basis to secondary schools that have a drop out rate of 40% or higher, provide funds for additional school counselors to identify and work with students who are at risk of not graduating in 4 years, include a sense of Congress that a secondary school that receives a grant should aim to provide 1 additional counselor per 250 students at risk, allow any additional resources to be used to supplement, rather than supplant funds from available non-federal sources, provide for demonstration projects to be implemented in no less than 10 schools, and authorize $6 million a year for four years and mandate that only schools able to increase their graduation rates by an average of 2.5% per year are able to renew their grants.

Child Nutrition Act

In supporting the reauthorization of the Child Nutrition Act in 2009, Senator Casey stated that while the federal government provided help to state and local governments through the economic recovery package, their budgets are still tight. He stated that he couldn't think of a better investment than investing in the future of our children and the future of our country. He noted that well-fed, healthy kids are the lynchpin to many other major policy initiatives, and that Children who are hungry and malnourished cannot take full advantage of their education opportunities.

Support for School Lunch Program

When the USDA decided to cancel a Philadelphia program that provided free nutritious meals to all students, Senator Casey called the act short-sighted and and stated that the move undid years of progress to end childhood hunger. He urged the USDA to rethink the decision and called for funding for the program until 2015 to give the city time to rework their budget. A full 72% of all Philadelphia kids in public schools and 200 of the neediest schools out of the total 280 Philadelphia schools participated in the universal meals program.

Prepare All Kids Act

In 2009, Senator Casey introduced the Prepare All Kids Act. That legisaltion would provide at least one year of voluntary high quality prekindergarten, with a focus on children from low income families and children with special needs, require pre-kindergarten programs to utilize a research-based curriculum that supports children’s cognitive, social, emotional and physical development and individual learning styles, limit classroom size to a maximum of 20 children and children-to-teacher ratios to no more than 10 to 1, require that pre-kindergarten teachers have bachelors’ degrees (within 6 years), with support for teacher educational development, provide designated funding for much-needed programs serving infants and toddlers, ages birth through three, meet the needs of children and working parents by providing specific funding that states can use to expend programs to full-day and year-round, support and reinforce the importance of other early childhood programs such as Head Start and child care programs by maintaining existing funding levels for those programs, ensure continued pre-kindergarten program quality by requiring states to develop and enforce a monitoring plan, and support the critical role of parents in the education of their young children by encouraging parental involvement in programs and assisting families in getting the supportive services they may need.

Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act

In 2010, Senator Casey supported the passage of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Ac. That legislation would allow school districts with a given number of students already receiving free school lunches to change the entire school to one that received free lunches.

 

 

Subsidized Pre-K

In March of 2007, Senator Casey released a press statement noting and amendment he was introducing to create a reserve fund for pre-k and use that money to subsidize lower income families.

 

Early Childhood Education

In June of 2007, Senator Casey released a press statement noting his support for public funding of early education.

 

The Put School Counselors Where They’re Needed Act

In July of 2008, Senator Casey released a press statement noting legislation he was introducing called the Put School Counselors Where They’re Needed Act.

 

Child Nutrition Act

In March of 2009, Senator Casey released a press statement noting that the Child Nutrition Act was a top priority.

 

Support for School Lunch Program

In October of 2008, Senator Casey released a press statement noting his opposition to ending a school lunch program in Philadelphia.

 

The Prepare All Kids Act

In April of 2009, Senator Casey released a press statement noting legislation that he was introducing called the Prepare All Kids Act.

 

Child Nutrition Bill

In August of 2010, Senator Casey released a press statement applauding the passage of legislation to change school lunch programs changed so that individuals are not required to apply for assistance but rather whole schools can apply.

 

Official Website Statements

 

Voting Record

America COMPETES Reauthorization Act

In May of 2010 the House voted on reauthorizing the America COMPETES Act. The act passed the House 262-150. Doug Lamborn voted against reauthorizing the America COMPETES Act.

Doug Lamborn voted against reauthorizing the America COMPETES Act.

College Cost Reduction and Access Act

The College Cost Reduction and Access Act is a significant education bill dealing largely with funding for higher education. The bill removes tuition sensitivity for Pell Grants, increases the amount available for Pell grants, Funds the Upward Bound program, establishes the TEACH Grants, reduces student loan repayment rates, sets deferments based on need and establishes some partner based grants. The bill got the full support of the Democrats, but passed with the support of only about 1/4 of the Republicans. Doug Lamborn voted against the College Cost Reduction and Access Act.

Doug Lamborn voted against the College Cost Reduction and Access Act.

 

Sponsored and Cosponsored Legislation

Session-110; Bill Number-H R 1539; Academic Partnerships Lead Us to Success Act or the A PLUS Act - Cosponsor

Allows each state to submit to the Secretary of Education a declaration of intent, applicable for up to five years, permitting it to receive federal funds on a consolidated basis that would otherwise be directed toward specific programs furthering the stated purpose of title I (Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. Requires each declaration to be formulated by a combination of specified State Authorizing Officials or by referendum, and list the programs for which consolidated funding is requested. Allows states to use such funds for any educational purpose permitted by state law, but requires states to make certain assurances that they will use fiscal control and fund accounting procedures, abide by federal civil rights laws, and advance educational opportunities for the disadvantaged. Allows states to amend their declarations. Requires each declaration state to: (1) inform the public of its student achievement assessment system and annually report on student progress toward the state's proficiency standards, disaggregating performance data by specified student groups; and (2) keep aggregate spending on elementary and secondary education at no less than 90% of such spending for the school year coinciding with this Act's enactment. Limits administrative expenses. Requires consolidated funds to be distributed in a manner that allows for the equitable, as determined by each state, participation of private schools.

Session-111; Bill Number-H R 1717; Academic Partnerships Lead Us to Success Act or the A PLUS Act - Cosponsor

Allows each state to submit to the Secretary of Education a declaration of intent, applicable for up to five years, permitting it to receive federal funds on a consolidated basis that would otherwise be directed toward specific programs furthering the stated purpose of title I (Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. Requires each declaration to be formulated by a combination of specified State Authorizing Officials or by referendum, and list the programs for which consolidated funding is requested. Allows states to use such funds for any educational purpose permitted by state law, but requires them to make certain assurances that they will use fiscal control and fund accounting procedures, abide by federal civil rights laws, and advance educational opportunities for the disadvantaged. Allows states to amend their declarations. Requires each declaration state to: (1) inform the public of its student achievement assessment system and report annually on student progress toward the state's proficiency standards, disaggregating performance data by specified student groups; and (2) keep aggregate spending on elementary and secondary education at no less than 90% of such spending for the school year coinciding with this Act's enactment. Limits administrative expenses. Requires consolidated funds to be distributed in a manner that allows for the equitable participation of private schools.

Session-111; Bill Number-H R 1833; Children's Hope Act of 2009 - Cosponsor

Amends the Internal Revenue Code to allow a tax credit of up to $100 ($200 for joint returns) for charitable contributions to an education investment organization that disburses 90% of its contributions to provide grants to students for elementary and secondary education expenses, if at least 50% of such disbursements go to students who qualify for free or reduced-cost school lunches. Requires a taxpayer claiming such credit, as a condition of eligibility to receive it, to first claim a state qualified scholarship tax credit.

Session-111; Bill Number-H R 2274; Priorities in Education Spending Act - Cosponsor

Repeals specified provisions of the: (1) Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965; (2) Early Learning Opportunities Act; (3) Higher Education Act of 1965; (4) Higher Education Amendments of 1998; (5) Education of the Deaf Act of 1986; (6) Higher Education Opportunity Act; (7) Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980; (8) Higher Education Amendments of 1992; (9) Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968; (10) Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006; (11) Special Olympics Sport and Empowerment Act of 2004; (12) Head Start Act; (13) Workforce Investment Act; (14) National Environmental Education Act; and (15) America COMPETES Act. Prohibits the Secretary of Education from obligating any funds to implement a literacy program for prisoners under the National Literacy Act of 1991.

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