The Tenth Amendment

Summary

The tenth amendment to the US Constitution reaffirms that the US federal government has the 18 powers enumerated to it by Article 1, Section 8 of the Constitution. In reinforcing this idea of federalism, the tenth amendment states that any power not granted to the federal government within the enumerated powers is reserved to the states or the people.

There are no significant votes on the tenth amendment. However, if a Senator or Representative comments on the matter, it will be shown under the tenth amendment tab.

 

Text of the Tenth Amendment

The Tenth Amendment (Amendment X) to the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, was ratified on December 15, 1791. The Tenth Amendment explicitly states the Constitution's principle of federalism by providing that powers not granted to the federal government nor prohibited to the states by the Constitution are reserved to the states or the people.

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

 

Additional Legislation

Each year, there are numerous bills introduced that are not voted on in the House or Senate. These bills may be sponsored by numerous people and a representative's co-sponsorship of that legislation gives insight into that person's viewpoints.

Senate Bills on The Tenth Amendment
SessionBill NumberCo-SponsorsBill Title
111S 402030Restoring the 10th Amendment Act
111S 131920The Enumerated Powers Act
 

House Bills on The Tenth Amendment
SessionBill NumberCo-SponsorsBill Title
112H R 4556410th Amendment Regulatory Reform Act
112H R 12526Enumerated Powers Act
112H R 12526Enumerated Powers Act